Virtual Ice Breakers: Games & Ideas for Meetings

Start by sharing the image of the crew of a pirate ship and ask each person to choose who they most identify with. Then ask everyone to share, either in the icebreakers for virtual meetings chat, verbally on in breakout groups. When kicking off a virtual meeting, we have additional work to do in order to position the session for success.

ice breakers for large virtual meetings

The game works by having one person start a sentence with by saying a single word. The next person then jumps in to add the next word to the sentence and play continues with each person in the room contributing a single word until the sentence is complete. The simplest way is to ask icebreaker questions at the start of your meeting. As a manager or team leader, you want to start the session with something fun before diving into the work. Weekly team meetings or one-on-one conferences are about to get much more fun for remote teams.

What are the benefits of doing icebreakers with large groups?

Create an abbreviation using your company’s mission statement or your team’s name before writing it on a whiteboard so everyone can take turns guessing. Put all your team members’ names into a random name or word selector website, like the random picker from MiniWebTool. When the site chooses a name, that person has five seconds to name one famous mom.

ice breakers for large virtual meetings

Whether they achieved it or not, the answers will be tiny peeks into their personalities. Come up with a list of pop quiz questions about the latest celebrity gossip, popular show, or whatever else you can think of in the pop culture realm. Asking one new question at the start of each meeting results in everyone submitting their answers before discussing the subject.

Icebreaker #5: Draw Anything Your Teammates Imagine

Next, put people in breakouts and invite them to choose a quote to discuss with the group. They might cover that the quote means to them, whether they think the same, or simply wonder what it has to do with the session ahead. The feeling of disconnection in the workplace is startlingly common and is a leading cause of frequent employee turnover. Additionally, higher turnover can cost businesses up to $1,200 per employee—just from a lack of engagement in the workplace! A simple way to do this is by integrating virtual icebreakers into the start of your meetings when your team is already gathered to collaborate.

  • To get over this tension, fun icebreakers can be used to start conversations and rule out any nervousness.
  • And in the call you can put the song with no lyrics and the first person who guesses it wins.
  • You can ask a professional to guide the meditation, or you could use applications such as Calm or Mindfulness.
  • It is a question game in which a person asks a question and the others have to name a person ‘Who is most likely to’ be in that situation.
  • You can begin with everyone just throwing random facts out there, asking questions, and seeing where they can make connections—even if it’s a stretch!
  • While traditional yoga is all about intentional movements and breathing, baby yoga is a silly way to encourage activity and laughter.
  • Your coworkers could mention their favorite band in middle school or the song they had on repeat in high school to help everyone get to know them.
  • Icebreaker questions allow your team to interact better and are particularly helpful to new and shy members.

Just make sure the emphasis is heavy on family and light on feud (jokes!). If you’re kicking off a virtual meeting with a new team, chances are you’re not all located in the same city or region (or even country). Have participants describe the city or town where they live, and name something they https://remotemode.net/ find iconic about that place. At the start of a Zoom meeting, simply ask each team member to name five items they would bring with them if they were stranded on a desert island. After, open the floor up for discussion so that each individual can find others who share the same thought processes.

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